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Growing Celeriac

How to grow Celeriac in  garden beds

and allotments

 

Celeriac

Family/Latin Name

Apiaceae - Apium graveolens var. rapaceum

Type of Plant

Bulbous - Crop Rotation Group = Others

Suitable for

 

Garden Beds, Allotments


Pests & Diseases    Companion Plants    In the Kitchen

See also:-  Vegetable Growing Glossary  |    Container Growing  | Buying Seeds & Plants

 

Plant Dimensions

Height +60cm/2ft  -  Spread up to 45cm/18"

Yield Per Plant
Yield per 1.5m/5ft row
 
1 Celeriac Bulb
1.8kg/4lb

Time between sowing and harvesting

34 weeks

Where to Sow

Indoors in small pots

Sowing time

March - temperature  16-21C/60-70F

How to Sow

2 seeds per 7.5cm/3" pot 12mm/½-inch deep

After Germination

Remove weakest seedling. Keep well watered but not too wet.

Growing on -  in Pots

Not generally recommended but there's nothing to stop you trying provided you have very large and deep containers.

Growing on -  in open ground

Harden off plants and finally move outdoors in May or June once all danger of frost has passed.  Plant out in rows or blocks 37cm/18" apart each way. Plant firmly, water in and be sure not to bury the crowns though the stem base should be at ground level.

Aftercare

Keep weed free.

 

Remove side shoots then from mid-summer start removing the lower leaves to expose the bulb.

 

In late September, draw the surrounding soil up around the bulbs. 

Harvesting

Begin lifting the bulbs from  October,  but aim at growing the bulbs to maximum size (about 12cm/5") as neither the texture or taste deteriorate. Continue lifting until spring. Covering the bulbs with straw or fleece will help lifting from frozen ground much easier.

Pests and Diseases

Companion Plants

Carrot Root Fly
Indications First sign is that the carrot leaves may look a reddish rust colour. Lifted carrots have small holes and short white maggots
Treatment None once infected
Prevention Organic
1. Companion Planting
2. Prevent the fly getting to the carrots by erecting barriers about 45cm/18" high around the rows or beds, using stakes and polythene sheeting or fleece.
3. Sow carrot fly resistant varieties such as "flyaway" or "Sytan".
Chemical
Apply an insecticide containing Lambda-cyhalothrin
Celery Fly
Indications Brown blisters in leaves 
Treatment Organic
Pinch out and destroy blistered leaves
Chemical
Spray with an insecticide containing Malathion
Prevention Grow under garden fleece or fine mesh
Slugs
Indications Young leaves are eaten - sometimes completely missing
Treatment Organic
1. Sink small pots filled with beer to ground level. Empty daily
2. Sprinkle slugs with table salt
Chemical
Use slug pellets
Prevention  None

 Companion Flower Graphic

Onion & Cabbage Families, Tomato, Broad Beans, Nasturtium

 

Create a bio-diverse environment by planting flowers nearby to attract bees, ladybirds and other "friendlies". To learn more about companion planting click here.

 

In the Kitchen

Storage: Best to harvest when you are ready to use. Keeps for  4-7 days in a cool, dark dry place or refrigerator.  Twist off the leaves before storing for any length of time. Can also be stored in sturdy boxes between layers of damp peat and kept in the garage or shed.

Preparing:  Wash in cold water.  Cut a thin slice from each end  then thickly peel to remove the skin and reveal the white centre.  drop into acidulated water or rub with lemon juice to prevent discolouration.

Cooking

Bake/Roast

Chunks, slices  or Cubes =  40 - 60 minutes

Boil

Chunks, slices  or Cubes =  15 - 20 minutes

Fry/Sauté

 Par-boil Cubes or slices or grate first = 5-8 minutes

Steam

Chunks, slices  or Cubes =  20 - 25 minutes

For more preparation and cooking information about celeriac plus lots of  recipes visit our sister site www.recipes4us.co.uk

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